Museum

museum-coin.png


The museum is an institution owned by the town. The player can study and donate fossils, fish, fine art, and bugs. Nintendo has selected common specimens in the world, so most should be familiar to or learned by everyone. Because its only employee is the owl Blathers, the Museum relies on you to donate caught or purchased specimens. Because the museum is small, Blathers can accept only the first specimen offered. If the player attempts to donate something the museum already has, Blathers will apologise, name the character who donated it, and return the item to the player. You can sell duplicates at Re-Tail, release them, display them in your home, (or, if gyroids, collect them and experiment with combinations to make a pleasant sound in your house).

After players donate everything to the museum, they will receive letters in the mail with the museum model attached. Every player in your town gets a model from the museum, even if they have not donated anything.

Museum.JPG
The outside of the museum.


Collections

The museum emphasises the natural history of your town, offering an aquarium, insectarium, geological history museum, and a classical art museum. (This is the third version in which Blathers has been qualified to identify vertebrate fossils.) Your fossil is dug with a shovel, above stars on the ground. Warning: some are pit falls, made with delicate seeds. Hint: Some prankish people save these, most dispose of them at Re-Tail for a cost, and some walk on them, fall, then climb from the pit by holding the joystick in any direction. Other buried objects are either fossils (usually four found a day), whose stars are difficult to see in soil, or little artificial-intelligence robots called gyroids. The fossils are a cluster of bones in a blue claystone, which Blathers identifies on the spot, cleans, and displays within seconds. Gyroids, found especially after rain or snow, are not of historical interest, but you can display them yourself in a room you rent in the museum shop, on the second floor. (See pictures at end.)

Donations

If you choose to donate to the museum, your pocket will appear with all irrelevant objects or duplicate specimens darkened. Choose from among the lighter specimens. Fish, Blathers is fond of but he's phobic towards insects (and insists you keep 'the beast caged'). In Animal Crossing: City Folk, Blathers was more candid: 'We shall endeavour to keep the wretch safe and happy.' (The photo below, containing a Rafflesia, shows otherwise.) Blathers ignores newly dug fossils until you choose 'Assess a fossil!' from the menu. He will then identify it, clean it, and return it to you. If it is not in the Museum, he will make a slight plea for it. You can donate it (recommended) or sell it at Re-Tail. Fossils fetch significant sums. The last class of object is art. This version of Animal Crossing includes famous sculptures as well as famous paintings & prints. Most art on the Animal Crossing market is fake; and once a week, Redd will pitch his green tent near the Town Tree.

Buying art

Redd will have four works of art for sale, though you can buy only one. Before entering his tent, have 4000 bells in your pocket, a list of art you've already donated, and this website open to paintings and sculptures. Follow the instructions on the page, move the camera for the best view, and you'll always leave with a genuine masterpiece (mailed you the next day, presumably from out of town if it's fake). Art displays the donor on its label, fossils are discussed on their labels and on the fossils page, and the sign outside lists the museum's collection and its donors.

Local donations only

Because your museum documents your town, Blathers should not accept donations from other towns. Each town's museum can have only local donations from players living in that town.

Visiting

It's easy to get lost. When you are, look for the orange carpet with owl insignia. As you enter the building, you may stop and examine the collections on the front sign, if you wish. There are two doors to the west, two to the east, and possibly stairs behind Blathers (if your museum has a museum shop with its private galleries.)

Education

Exhibited are images of actual specimens of the most common creatures and most famous art in the world. One should become familiar with them. To assist you, each tank, region, or work of art has a label. In the case of fish, this lists a common name of each fish currently in that tank, bugs (insects are limited to six legs) are in regions with labels on brown posts, fossils have labels on blue posts, paintings have labels on the wainscotting of the wall, and sculptures' labels are on their grey mounts.

To learn more about a Napoleonfish (a Humphead Wrasse), for example, you may prefer to first press UP on the D-pad, then press on the rectangular label to read about the fish. Keep pressing the label, 'A' (or even 'B') until the detailed description is finished. You can stop anywhere by pressing the 'Close' icon at the bottom of the lower screen. Art is given an English translation of the name it goes by, the artist, the date of creation, and the medium used. It is hoped that this website will supplement these descriptions. Many French impressionist paintings, for example, are housed today in Paris at the Musée d'Orsay rather than the Louvre, because impressionism was frowned upon by the French government, and these world-renowned paintings were rejected by the Louvre.

Tours

Fossil collections are through the first door to the west. Note you're on the last row of large tiles in a room of large, carnivorous (meat-eating) dinosaurs. Continue walking forward to the next room for herbivorous (plant-eating) dinosaurs. Keep on the large tiles and walk south to the third room. These look like dinosaurs, but aren't. The reptiles here have a lizard-like, not bird-like pelvis (hip), preventing them from standing upright on their hind legs (as dinosaurs do). Many are aquatic, many preceded the dinosaurs, many that died during the Late Cretaceous extinction have ancestors alive today. Archelon sp., for example, is though to have evolved into today's leather-back sea turtle. Vertebrate fossils that stand like dinosaurs are mammals, like the woolly mammoth and Sabre-toothed tiger. Along the north wall is a painting of a beach similar to that of Animal Crossing. Volcanoes in the distance may be oceanic, surrounded by coral reefs similar to the homes of fish caught here by pole. Notice the mainly invertebrate fossils mounted on stands before the painting. Fossil sea shells are, by far, the fossils more important to stratigraphers and evolutionary biologists. Walk east on the large tiles to the orange carpet, and turn north to your first room with its once-envisioned picture of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic extinction. Keep on the large tiles and turn east at the Tyrannosaurus Rex to the orange carpet and lobby.

The insectarium is through the second door to the west. When you first reach the dark gravel, press UP on the D-Pad to see the player's perspective. Press LEFT or RIGHT on the D-Pad to rotate your view. This view will remain until you enter a new room (and all goes black), when you must reset it. Walk up to the signs and press the A button. Press the DOWN D-Pad for a downward view of the butterflies. Take the east door to the beetle room. Play with UP and DOWN (twice) on your D-Pad. Take the west door to the room of large beetles and butterflies.

tumblr_mjvtyoukUv1s1gk0ao1_400.jpg
Bug exhibit



Note that Blathers has difficulty maintaining this room (shown above), for the large, red, (amusingly predaceous) Rafflesia sp. indicates in Animal Crossing a totally unmaintained environment. Rotate south, walk through the centre door, and you will again be in the first room of insects. Leave by the dark path to the lobby.

Walk straight across the lobby to the aquarium. A blue colour indicates sea creatures. Press your D-Pad UP. The first case simulates the sandy bottom just off the beach and the sea-floor life that lives there. Pass the small chambers reserved for special sea creatures and walk through the north door. You will now have to press you D-Pad UP again.

tumblr_mjognhTV6J1s1gk0ao1_400.jpg
Fish exhibit


You see a shallow, tropical reef and the fish that live there. If lucky, you may see sharks and a Napoleonfish (Humphead Wrasse). Walk to the northwest and sit for a photo, if you wish. Walk through the west door to a green, river environment. Again, press you D-Pad UP. First is a cylindrical tank of small, tropical, oceanic reef fish. Click your D-Pad LEFT and RIGHT, so you face the tanks. The first rectangular tank contains tropical river fish, many from the Amazon of South America. If lucky, you will hear a piranha, tapping gently at your nose. The next rectangular tank contains temperate river fish, many from the Mississippi of North America. Finally, as you work your way south, there is a cylindrical tank of small, tropical & temperate fish common to home aquariums. Continue south to the first, sea-floor chamber. Walk forward to the owl, and turn west to the lobby.

Walk south in the lobby, toward its entrance. Turn east into the Art gallery. Note the pattern of the carpet you are on. These rooms will be empty for some time. The dark, heavy stands hold statues, and the labels on the walls are for paintings or prints. When these two rooms contain objects, lowering your point of vision and rotating it with the D-Pad displays the art wonderfully. Return west to the lobby to complete your tour of the museum. The museum is open 24 hours a day. Check the board outside for a list of exhibits and contributors.

Museum shop

The 2nd floor of the museum is run by Blathers's little sister, Celeste. She tends a shop that allows you to rent rooms to display your own exhibits. Most of the items available in the museum shop are not found elsewhere. The lockers upstairs provide access to your home storage space.

Item in shop
Price in Bells
Requirements
Exhibit-room wallpaper
400
None
Exhibit-room flooring
400
None
Museum wallpaper
2,000
None
Museum flooring
2,000
None
Arrow sign
3,500
None
Display stand
1,500
None
Exhibit partition
3,000
None
Fancy frame
10,000
None
Flat display case
2,500
None
Glass display case
2,000
None
Museum chair
3,000
None
Poster stand
2,500
None
Reception table
2,000
None
Rope partition
1,800
None
Tall display case
2,500
None
Thermohygrometer
1,500
None
Silver shovel
500
After donating 15 fossils
Paint-ball floor
1,600
After donating 20 art works
Dig-site floor
1,600
after donating 30 fossils
Silver rod
500
After donating 30 fishes or sea-floor life
Silver net
500
After donating 30 bugs
Underwater floor
1,600
After donating 50 fishes or sea-floor life
Jungle floor
1,600
After donating 50 bugs
Paint-ball wall
1,600
After donating all art works
Underwater wall
1,600
After donating all fishes and sea-floor life
Dig-site wall
1,600
After donating all fossils
Jungle wall
1,600
After donating all bugs
Museum model
1,800
After donating all specimens to museum


pop_c_01_img.jpg
One of the display rooms
tumblr_mi7zkaRna71s1gk0ao3_250.jpg
Museum furniture pieces can be seen in the background